I was now face to face with the castle moat, which was, indeed, very wide and very deep. Alas! I could not swim, and my chance of escape seemed of a truth hopeless, as, doubtless, it would have been had I not espied a boat tied to the wall by a r... Read more of Crossing The Moat at Math Puzzle.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Domestic Animals

Dog Breeds   -   Dogs   -   Cats  -   Fish  -   Guinea Pigs

Farms Animals

Mules   -   Cattle

Wild Animals

Ducks   -  Birds   -  Bee Keeping   -  Bee Hunting   -  Fur Animals


Rabies






Category: Diseases and their Remedies

Hydrophobia in cattle is the result of the bite of a rabid dog, from
which bite no animal escapes. The effects produced by the wound made by
the teeth of such an animal, after the virus is once absorbed into the
circulation of the blood, are so poisonous that all treatment is
useless. The proper remedies must be instantly applied to prevent this
absorption, or the case is utterly hopeless. Among men, nine out of
every ten bitten by rabid dogs escape the terrible effects resulting
from this dreadful disorder, without resorting to any applications to
prevent it. It is a well-established fact, that men, when bitten by
dogs, are generally wounded in some part protected by their clothing,
which guards them from the deleterious effects of the saliva which
covers the teeth, and which, at such times, is deadly poison. The teeth,
in passing through the clothing, are wiped clean, so that the virus is
not introduced into the blood; hence the comparatively few cases of
rabies occurring in man. When, however, the wound is made upon an
exposed surface, as the flesh of the hand, or of the face, this fatal
disease is developed in spite of every precaution, unless such
precautions are immediately taken. For this reason, cattle when bitten,
do not escape the disease.

Symptoms.--The animal separates itself from the rest of the herd,
standing in a kind of stupor, with the eyes half-closed; respiration
natural; pulse quickened; temperature of body and limbs natural; the
slightest noise agitates, causing the eyes to glare and exciting
bellowing; the bark of a dog produces the most violent effects; the
animal foams at the mouth and staggers as it walks; if water is
offered, the muzzle is plunged into it, but the victim cannot drink; in
making the effort, the most fearful consequences are produced. The
animal now seeks to do mischief,--and the quicker it is then destroyed,
the better.

Treatment.--This must be applied quickly, or not at all. The moment an
animal is bitten, that moment the wound should be searched for, and when
found, should be freely opened with a knife, and lunar caustic, caustic
potash, or the permanganate of potash at once applied to all parts of
the wound, care being taken not to suffer a single scratch to escape.
This, if attended to in time, will save the animal.





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